Sunday, October 17, 2010

Today in Music History ~ 10/17

• 1810 ~ Giovanni Matteo Mario, Italian tenor

OCMS 1849 ~ Frédéric François Chopin died at the age of 39 due to pulmonary tuberculosis.  All of Chopin's works involve the piano. They are technically demanding but emphasize nuance and expressive depth. Chopin invented the musical form known as the instrumental ballade and made major innovations to the piano sonata, mazurka, waltz, nocturne, polonaise, étude, impromptu and prélude.

• 1892 ~ Herbert Howells, British composer

• 1909 ~ Cozy (William Randolph) Cole, Drummer. He played with Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong, in films - Make Mine Music, The Glenn Miller Story and started a drummers’ school with Gene Krupa

• 1938 ~ This was a big day in Tinseltown. NBC moved to the corner of Sunset and Vine, the ‘Crossroads of the World’. The new Hollywood Radio City drew thousands of visitors ready to fill studio-audience seats for popular radio programs.

• 1940 ~ James Seals, Singer, guitar, saxophone, fiddle with Seals and Crofts

• 1940 ~ One year before recording that memorable song, Fry Me Cookie, with a Can of Lard, Will Bradley’s orchestra recorded Five O’Clock Whistle, also on Columbia Records.

• 1941 ~ Alan Howard, Bass with Brian Poole & The Tremeloes

• 1942 ~ Gary Puckett, Singer with The Union Gap

• 1945 ~ Actress Ava Gardner made news. She married bandleader Artie Shaw.

• 1946 ~ Jim Tucker, Guitarist with The Turtles until 1965

• 1949 ~ Bill Hudson, Comedian, singer with The Hudson Brothers, was married to actress Goldie Hawn

• 1953 ~ The first concert of contemporary Canadian music presented in the U.S. was performed by conductor Leopold Stokowski at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

• 1955 ~ Jose Ferrer and Claire Bloom starred on NBC’s Producer’s Showcase. They performed in "Cyrano De Bergerac". Ferrer also won an Oscar for his performance in the film version.

• 1958 ~ Alan Jackson, Singer

• 1962 ~ Though the ‘Fab Four’ would appear on both radio and television, on what they would call ‘Auntie Beeb’ (the BBC), The Beatles made their first appearance this day on Great Britain’s Grenada TV Network.

• 1967 ~ A controversial rock musical "Hair", opened on this day at the Anspacher Theatre in New York City. It ran for 1,742 performances and then became a movie.

• 1983 ~ Actor Anthony Quinn lit up the Great White Way in the revival of the 1968 musical, "Zorba", that reunited Quinn with Lila Kedrova, who played Madame Hortense. They both had appeared in the film portrayal, "Zorba the Greek", which won Quinn a nomination for Best Actor, and an Oscar for Kedrova as Best Supporting Actress. This was one of the few films that came before the Broadway show, rather than the reverse.

• 2003 ~ Bernard Schwartz, who produced "Coal Miner's Daughter," the Academy Award-nominated biopic of country singer Loretta Lynn, died of complications following a stroke. He was 85. Schwartz was a one-time Broadway child actor who got into television and film production in the 1950s, working on the popular paranormal suspense show "Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond" and the hit science fiction film "Journey to the Center of the Earth." Schwartz' best known and most lauded production was "Coal Miner's Daughter," the 1980 film inspired by Lynn's song of the same name. Sissy Spacek won an Oscar for her portrayal of Lynn and the film won the Golden Globe award for best musical or comedy. It also was nominated for an Oscar for best picture. In 1985, Schwartz featured Patsy Cline's life in "Sweet Dreams," which was named for one of her songs and starred Jessica Lange as the music legend killed in a plane crash. He also produced country singer Amy Grant's 1986 TV special "Headin' Home for the Holidays" and worked with Priscilla Presley on the 1988 miniseries "Elvis and Me." Another of his best known productions was 1983's "Psycho II," the darkly humorous but far bloodier sequel to Hitchcock's 1960 thriller about troubled motel operator Norman Bates. Other feature films included "The Wackiest Ship in the Army," "Global Affair," which starred Bob Hope, and "Rage," which starred Glenn Ford. Schwartz also produced "That Man Bolt" and "Bucktown," both vehicles for former football star Fred Williamson, and the thriller "Roadgames" starring Stacey Keach and Jamie Lee Curtis.

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